Discovering your family's story

Writing Your Life Story

Four Reasons NOT to Write Down Your Life Story


Most of my father’s life story is lost forever.  I always meant to write it down, and he always said he would do it—but when we finally made time to do it together, he died not long after we started.  I would give a king’s ransom to know more details about his life before we kids came along.

I’ve heard lots of reasons for not writing down your life story…


1.  “I don’t know what to write about.”
A good list of questions solves that problem, and those are available online.  If a person starts with a good list, then it’s as simple as this:  (a) write down your thoughts about each question that interests you; (b) skip the ones that don’t; (c) throw in anything else that you think of along the way; and (d) the job is done!


2.  “I’m not a very good writer/speller.”
That’s like saying, “I’m not a very good mechanic, so I’m not going to drive a car.”  The fact is, we get help with the things we’re not good at.  One of my favorite things is editing—taking someone else’s rough thoughts and “cleaning them up.”  Most people know someone (or can hire someone) who is good at that.   But if you don’t, write down your story anyway!  A rough diamond is much better than no diamond.


3.  “I never did anything interesting, so it would be boring.”
My mother’s life consisted of growing up on a farm, getting married, and being a housewife for the rest of her life.  My husband’s mother’s life was the same.  But when people who love them read the life stories that I helped them write, those stories are more precious than gold.  Details that may seem boring to the writer, are fascinating to us who didn’t live in those times.  And so often, the better we understand our parents and grandparents, the more we love them.  


4.  “I’m not a very good typist.”
In the computer era, good typists are a dime a dozen.  Every child can type these days.  If you can write, someone else can type!  So write down your story, or dictate it to someone, or type it if you can—but don’t let it be forever lost.

So please, grandmas and grandpas, mothers and fathers, write out your memories for us!  It doesn’t have to be perfect or professional—just do the best you can.  We want to know what made you the person you are.  We want to see the world as you saw it, before we were born.  We want to walk a mile in your shoes.  We don’t want these stories to die with you.  Share your lives with us!  We want you to
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"How can you help me write my life story?  I don’t know how to begin or what to say!"

If you have memories that you can type, write out, or e-mail, then I can help you "clean them up" and put them together into a nice document that you can share with your family.  I can get your story copied and spiral-bound and mail you however many copies you need. Or I can email you the Word or PDF file and you can finish it as you like. Or it can be one section in your ancestry binder.  Here are two samples (with the names changed):  [Sample #1]   [Sample #2]

I have a simple guide you can follow. Just go through the guide and answer the questions in as little or as much detail as you want, loan me some photos to scan to spice it up, and I'll do the rest! 

Need a further nudge?  Here is a little piece I wrote for my blog…